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Linton Kwesi Johnson & The Dennis Bovell Dub Band -Licence fi kill. Back2Black Festival. Uploaded by rudiegonetojail

Been listening to excellent series on Jamaican music by Linton Kwesi Johnson. He is ably accompanied by the legendary Dennis Bovell Any US followers who think the sort of things that are going on in Ferguson don’t go on here in UK should check the introduction and lyrics

(Source: youtube.com)

Filed under Linton Kwesi Johnson Reggae Dub Poetry Dennis Bovell

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the-middle-eastern-feminist:

In developing countries, 79 % of economically active women spend their working hours producing food through agriculture. Women are 43% of the farming work force.
Yields for women farmers are 20-30 percent lower than for men. This is because women have less access to improved seeds, fertilizers and equipment.
Giving women farmers more resources could bring the number of hungry people in the world down by 100 - 150 million people.
Surveys in a wide range of countries have shown that 85 - 90 percent of the time spent on household food preparation is women’s time.
In some countries, tradition dictates that women eat last, after all the male members and children have been fed.
When a crisis hits, women are generally the first to sacrifice their food consumption, in order to protect the food consumption of their families.
Malnourished mothers are more likely to give birth to underweight babies. Underweight babies are 20 percent more likely to die before the age of five.
Around half of all pregnant women in developing countries are anaemic. This causes around 110,000 deaths during child birth each year.
Research confirms that, in the hands of women, an increase in family income improves children’s health and nutrition.
Education is key. One study showed that women’s education contributed 43% of the reduction in child malnutrition over time, while food availability accounted for 26%. 
SOURCES: Women in Agriculture: Closing the Gender Gap for Development, FAO, March 2011 (Facts 2, 3, 9, 10); The Role of Women in Rural Development, Food Production and Poverty Eradication, UN Women, 2012  (Fact 4);  Committee on Food Security, FAO, 2011;  (Fact 5, 6) Progress for Children: A World Fit for Children, UNICEF, 2007 (Fact 7); The Female Face of Farming, FAO, 2012 (citing Smith and Haddad 2000) (Facts 1 , 8).

the-middle-eastern-feminist:

  • In developing countries, 79 % of economically active women spend their working hours producing food through agriculture. Women are 43% of the farming work force.
  • Yields for women farmers are 20-30 percent lower than for men. This is because women have less access to improved seeds, fertilizers and equipment.
  • Giving women farmers more resources could bring the number of hungry people in the world down by 100 - 150 million people.
  • Surveys in a wide range of countries have shown that 85 - 90 percent of the time spent on household food preparation is women’s time.
  • In some countries, tradition dictates that women eat last, after all the male members and children have been fed.
  • When a crisis hits, women are generally the first to sacrifice their food consumption, in order to protect the food consumption of their families.
  • Malnourished mothers are more likely to give birth to underweight babies. Underweight babies are 20 percent more likely to die before the age of five.
  • Around half of all pregnant women in developing countries are anaemic. This causes around 110,000 deaths during child birth each year.
  • Research confirms that, in the hands of women, an increase in family income improves children’s health and nutrition.
  • Education is key. One study showed that women’s education contributed 43% of the reduction in child malnutrition over time, while food availability accounted for 26%. 
  • SOURCES: Women in Agriculture: Closing the Gender Gap for Development, FAO, March 2011 (Facts 2, 3, 9, 10); The Role of Women in Rural Development, Food Production and Poverty Eradication, UN Women, 2012  (Fact 4);  Committee on Food Security, FAO, 2011;  (Fact 5, 6) Progress for Children: A World Fit for Children, UNICEF, 2007 (Fact 7); The Female Face of Farming, FAO, 2012 (citing Smith and Haddad 2000) (Facts 1 , 8).

(via fuckyeah-radicalfeminism)

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Bob & Marcia - Young, Gifted And Black [1970]. Uploaded by Frits Fruitmachien

To be young, gifted and black, Oh what a lovely precious dream To be young, gifted and black, Open your heart to what I mean

In the whole world you know There are billion boys and girls Who are young, gifted and black, And that’s a fact!

Young, gifted and black We must begin to tell our young There’s a world waiting for you This is a quest that’s just begun

When you feel really low Yeah, there’s a great truth you should know When you’re young, gifted and black Your soul’s intact

Young, gifted and black How I long to know the truth There are times when I look back And I am haunted by my youth

Oh but my joy of today Is that we can all be proud to say To be young, gifted and black Is where it’s at

Music by Nina Simone, Lyrics by Weldon Irvine. Written in memory of Lorraine Hansbury. Sung here by Marcia Griffiths and Bob Andy. I also love Aretha Franklin’s version

(Source: youtube.com)

Filed under Aretha Franklin Marcia Griffiths Bob Andy Reggae Nina Simone Weldon Irvine Lorraine Hansbury

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Nina Simone Live At Montreux 1976 - Backlash Blues. Uploaded by bernardobarcellos

Mr. Backlash, Mr. Backlash

Just who do you think I am?

You raise my taxes, freeze my wages

And send my son to Vietnam


You give me second class houses

And second class schools

Do you think that all colored folks

Are just second class fools?


Mr. Backlash

I’m gonna leave you

With the backlash blues


When I try to find a job

To earn a little cash

All you got to offer

Is your mean old white backlash


But the world is big

Big and bright and round

And it’s full of folks like me

Who are black, yellow, beige and brown


Mr. Backlash

I’m gonna leave you

With the backlash blues


Mr. Backlash, Mr. Backlash

Just what do you think I got to lose

I’m gonna leave you

With the backlash blues

You’re the one will have the blues

Not me, just wait and see


Written by Nina Simone and the great Langston Hughes (who was at one point a Motown recording artiste!)

(Source: youtube.com)

Filed under Langston Hughes Nina Sinone African American Poetry

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225 Jewish Survivors of Nazi Genocide Condemn the Massacre of Palestinians

Jewish survivors and descendants of Jewish survivors of the Nazi genocide have signed a letter condemning Israel’s massacre in Gaza and calling for an end to the genocide of the Palestinian people.

In the letter, they also speak out against the abuse of their histories to promote the dehumanization of Palestinians.

The survivors wrote that they were “alarmed” by the dehumanization of Palestinians in the Israeli media, “which has reached a fever-pitch. In Israel, politicians and pundits in The Times of Israel and The Jerusalem Post have called openly for genocide of Palestinians and right-wing Israelis are adopting Neo-Nazi insignia.”

Finally, the survivors criticized ads placed by Elie Weisel in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and the Guardian, which they allege “abuses” their history, “to promote blatant falsehoods used to justify the unjustifiable: Israel’s wholesale effort to destroy Gaza and the murder of nearly 2,000 Palestinians, including many hundreds of children.”

(Source: ubuntuliberation, via the-uncensored-she)

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bowls-blunts-bhombs:

anarcho-queer:

Ferguson Police conveniently forgot to publicly release this part of the footage.

It shows Michael Brown paying for the pack of cigars he supposedly stole.

The officer who murdered Michael did not know he was a ‘suspect of a robbery’, so the tape of him ‘stealing’ the cigars have no relation to the killing.

But this footage is important because it proves that the police are trying to justify Mike’s murder by slandering his character.

Important!

(via bewareofchairs)

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Maya Angelou’s account of singing ‘Lift every voice and sing’ at her 8th grade graduation from ‘I know why the caged bird sings’

I had been listening and silently rebutting each sentence with my eyes closed; then there was a hush, which in an audience warns that something unplanned is happening. I looked up and saw Henry Reed, the conservative, the prophet, the A student, turn his back to the audience and turn to us (the proud assembled class of 1940) and sing, nearly speaking,

"Lift ev’ry voice and sing

Till earth and heaven ring

Ring with the harmonies of Liberty…”

It was a poem written by James Weldon Johnson. It was the Negro national anthem. Out of habit we were singing it.

Our mothers and fathers stood in the dark hall and joined the hymn of encouragement. A kindergarten teacher led the small children onto the stage and the buttercups and daisies and bunny rabbits marked time and tried to follow:

"Stony the road we trod,

Bitter the chastening rod,

Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;

Yet with a steady beat,

Have not our weary feet

Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?”

Every child I knew had learned that song with his ABC’s along with “Jesus loves me this I know.” But I personally had never heard it before. Never heard the words, despite the thousands of times I had sung them. Never thought they had anything to do with me.

On the other hand, the words of Patrick Henry had made such an impression on me that I had been able to stretch myself tall and trembling and say, “I know not what course others may take, but for me, give me liberty or give me death.”

And now I heard, really for the first time:

"We have come over a way that with tears has been watered,

We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered”

While echoes of the song shivered in the air, Henry Reed bowed his head, said “Thank you” and returned to his place in the line. The tears that slipped down many faces were not wiped away in shame.

We were on top again. As always, again. We survived. The depths had been icy and dark, but now a bright sun spoke to our souls. I was no longer simply a member of the proud graduating class of 1940; I was a proud member of the wonderful, beautiful Negro race.

Oh, Black and unknown poets, how often have you auctioned pains sustained us? Who will compute the lonely nights made less lonely by your songs, or the empty pots made less tragic by your tales?

If we were a people much given to revealing secrets, we might raise monuments and sacrifice to the memories of our poets, but slavery cured us of that weakness. It may be enough, however, to have it said that we survive in exact relationship to the dedication of our poets (include preachers, musicians and blues singers).

Filed under Maya Angelou African American Poetry African American Music